Smallest MLB Stadiums

If you're looking for an intimate baseball experience, check out one of these small stadiums.
Written by Mark Bailey
Last updated on

As a baseball fan, there’s nothing quite like watching a game at a large, imposing stadium. But for those looking for a more intimate experience, there are some much smaller stadiums in MLB. Here are the twelve smallest MLB stadiums, based on seating capacity.

12. Truist Park

Truist Park

Truist Park is a baseball stadium located in Atlanta, Georgia. It is the home of Major League Baseball’s Atlanta Braves. The ballpark opened in 2017, and has a capacity of 41,084 people. Truist Park was built as a replacement for Turner Field, which was the home of the Braves from 1997 to 2016. The stadium is named for Truist Financial Corporation, which merged with SunTrust Banks in 2019.

11. Comerica Park

Comerica Park

Comerica Park is located in Detroit, Michigan and is home to the Detroit Tigers. The ballpark opened in 2000 and has a seating capacity of 41,083 people. Comerica Park was built at a cost of $300 million and is one of the most technologically advanced stadiums in Major League Baseball. The stadium features a Ferris wheel, a carousel, and an interactive fountain in center field.

10. Guaranteed Rate Field

Guaranteed Rate Field

Guaranteed Rate Field is located in Chicago, Illinois and is home to the Chicago White Sox. The ballpark opened in 1991 and has a seating capacity of 40,615 people. The stadium was originally named Comiskey Park after White Sox owner Charles Comiskey. The name was changed to U.S. Cellular Field in 2003 and then to Guaranteed Rate Field in 2016.

9. Globe Life Field

Globe Life Field

Globe Life Field is a retractable roof stadium located in Arlington, Texas. It is the home of Major League Baseball’s Texas Rangers. The stadium opened in April 2020 and has a seating capacity of 40,300 people. The facility cost $1.2 billion to build and is the most expensive ballpark ever built.

8. Petco Park

Petco Park

Petco Park is located in San Diego, California and is home to the San Diego Padres. The ballpark opened in 2004 and has a seating capacity of 40,209 people. The ballpark is located in the downtown area of San Diego and is adjacent to the San Diego Convention Center.

7. PNC Park

PNC Park

PNC Park is located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and is home to the Pittsburgh Pirates. The ballpark opened in 2001 and has a seating capacity of 38,747 people. PNC Park was designed to incorporate the city’s three rivers into the ballpark’s design.

6. Target Field

 Target Field

Target Field is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and is home to the Minnesota Twins. The ballpark opened in 2010 and has a seating capacity of 38,544 people. Target Field was built at a cost of $522 million and is the second stadium in Major League Baseball to achieve LEED Gold certification. The stadium features a retractable glass door in center field that opens to reveal the center field concourse and Twins Tower.

5. Kauffman Stadium

Kauffman Stadium

Kauffman Stadium is located in Kansas City, Missouri and is home to the Kansas City Royals. The stadium opened in 1973 and has a seating capacity of 37,903 people. Kauffman Stadium is the sixth-oldest ballpark in Major League Baseball and was originally named Royals Stadium. The stadium was renamed in 1993 to honor Ewing Kauffman, the founder of the Royals. The stadium underwent a $250 million renovation in 2010 which included the addition of a Jumbotron, new scoreboards, and improved concessions.

4. Fenway Park

Fenway Park

Fenway Park is located in Boston, Massachusetts and is home to the Boston Red Sox. The ballpark opened in 1912, making it the oldest stadium in Major League Baseball. Fenway Park has a seating capacity of 37,755 people, which makes it the third-smallest stadium in the league. Fenway Park is well-known for its unique features such as the Green Monster, a 37-foot high wall in left field, and Pesky’s Pole, a right field foul pole that is only 302 feet from home plate.

3. loanDepot Park

loanDepot Park

loanDepot Park is a retractable roof stadium located in Miami, Florida. It is the home of Major League Baseball’s Miami Marlins. Construction was completed in March 2012 for the 2012 season and it was LEED certified as the greenest MLB park in 2012. The building is the sixth MLB stadium to have a retractable roof with a seating capacity of 37,442 making it the second-smallest stadium in Major League Baseball by capacity. The facility has hosted multiple events such as World Baseball Classic matches, 2017 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, soccer matches, fundraising galas and more. Thanks to these sustainable features, loanDepot Park is one of the most eco-friendly stadiums in the world.

2. Progressive Field

Progressive Field

Progressive Field is located in the downtown area of Cleveland, Ohio and is home to the Cleveland Guardians. The ballpark opened in 1994 as Jacobs Field, but was later renamed Progressive Field in 2008. The listed seating capacity for Progressive Field is 42,865 people, but has since been modified to accommodate 34,830 people. The Guardians have won ten Central Division titles and three American League pennants at Progressive Field. Progressive Field is part of the Gateway Sports and Entertainment Complex, which also includes Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse.

1. Tropicana Field

Tropicana Field

Tropicana Field is currently the smallest baseball stadium with a capacity of only 25,000 since 2019. The ballpark is located in St. Petersburg, Florida and is home to the Tampa Bay Rays. The ballpark opened in 1990 and technically could hold 42,735 people. They reduced the stadium capacity in 2019 when they decided to tarp off the upper decks. The stadium was originally built for $130 million and is the only ballpark in Major League Baseball to have a non-retractable roof. The roof protects fans from the Florida heat and humidity.

Stadiums with small capacities provide an intimate fan experience

Even if you’re not a baseball fan, these stadiums are worth checking out for the unique experience they offer. With their small size and intimate settings, these stadiums provide an up-close view of the game that’s hard to find elsewhere. If you’re looking for a new and different sports experience, be sure to check out one of these smallest MLB stadiums.

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